Early Bird Classes to be Offered in Spring by College of Health and Human Services

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo.,

Sept. 30, 2005 – If you’re up before the sun because you are an inherently early riser, then the College of Health and Human Services at Southeast Missouri State University has a new service tailor-made for you.

Beginning in spring 2006, the College will pilot four “Early Bird” classes. The courses are designed for a number of people, including those employed full time who are scheduled to be at work by 8 a.m., fitness gurus who work out between 5 and 6 a.m. and would enjoy taking a course just after their exercise routines, retirees who would like to take a class before the campus is “buzzing” with activity and University employees wanting to take a class that doesn’t conflict with their work hours.

“This concept has worked well on other campuses,” said Dr. Loretta Prater, dean of the College of Health and Human Services. “We don’t know how it will work here until we try.”

Two Early Bird classes will be taught in the Department of Human Environmental Studies, and two will be taught in the Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation.

The two in the Department of Human Environmental Studies include CF120 “The Child: Development from Conception to Adolescence,” taught by Dr. Sharo Shafaie, professor of human environmental studies, and UI340 “Housing Perspectives,” taught by Michelle Brune, assistant professor of human environmental studies. Both CF 120 “The Child” Development from Conception to Adolescence” and UI340 “Housing Perspectives” will be taught from 7 to 7:50 a.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. UI340 “Housing Perspectives” will be taught in Scully 103. CF120 “This Child” will be taught in Scully 111.

The two classes in the Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation are PE201 “Sport and Society,” taught by Dr. Tim Rademaker, associate professor of health, human performance and recreation, and HL120 “Health Perspectives,” taught by Dr. Mark Langenfeld, professor of health, human performance and recreation. HL120 “Health Perspectives” and PE201 “Sport and Society” both will be taught on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 7 to 7:50 a.m. HL120 will be held in Parker 202. PE201 will be held in Parker 201.

HL 120 “Health Perspectives” examines a wide variety of health topics with specific emphasis placed on individual health behaviors. Langenfeld has been cited several times in local and national media for his expertise on health and physical activity related topics. An avid cyclist, Langenfeld is an advocate of a healthy lifestyle both in the classroom and in practice.

PE 201 “Sport and Society” offers student the opportunity to study the relationshipsbetween society, culture, values and sport. Rademaker has been recognized by students and colleagues as one of the best instructors at Southeast. He came to Southeast as a varsity athlete out of high school. He has been on the Southeast faculty for more than 30 years. During Rademaker’s tenure, he has volunteered with the Southeast Track and Field Team. His background and experiences in the field of sport lend to the quality of the class.

Both of these courses are three credit hours and satisfy University Studies requirements.

“They are both very popular University Studies electives among the general student population,” said Dr. Joe Pujol, chair of the Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation.

CF 120 “The Child:  Development from Conception to Adolescence” offers students anoverview of the social, cognitive, physical and emotional changes that occur from conception to adolescence.  The course applies principles of development to the understanding of child development and behavior. This is a three-credit-hour University Studies course.

UI 340 “Housing Perspectives” studies the relationship between humans and the built environment, including social, psychological, economic and physical factors.  Prerequisites for this course include “Behavioral Systems,” “Social Systems,” “Economic Systems” and “Political Systems.”  This is an upper division, three-credit hour University Studies course.