Regents Grant Faculty Sabbatical Leaves

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The Southeast Missouri State University Board of Regents today granted sabbatical leaves to three faculty members during a closed session meeting of the board.

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo.,

Dec. 15, 2006 – The Southeast Missouri State University Board of Regents today granted sabbatical leaves to three faculty members during a closed session meeting of the board.

They are Dr. Marcus Bond, associate professor of chemistry; Dr. Timothy Ray, professor of mathematics; and Dr. Carol Morrow, professor of anthropology. Bond and Ray’s sabbaticals will be for the 2007-2008 academic year. Morrow’s sabbatical will be for the fall 2007 semester.

Bond’s sabbatical is contingent upon his being granted a prestigious Fulbright fellowship in sub-Saharan Africa. He will work at the College of Technology at Copperbelt University in Kitwe, Zambia, where he will teach general chemistry, assist in developing a new bachelor of education in science and mathematics program, conduct crystallographic research on copper(II), halide compounds, and establish a program of crystallography education and access to crystallographic services. Bond is academically trained in chemistry, physics and mathematics. Since many of the faculty at Copperbelt University do not have doctoral degrees, Bond will bring faculty expertise in developing a new program in science and mathematics education.

Ray has an opportunity to work for the National Security Agency (NSA) in their Sabbatical Leave Program. NSA is the largest employer of research mathematicians in the country. The National Security Agency is the cryptologic organization for the U.S. government. The NSA coordinates, directs and performs highly specialized activities to protect U.S. government information systems and produce foreign signals intelligence information. A high technology organization, NSA is on the frontiers of communications and data processing.  It is also one of the most important centers of foreign language analysis and research within the government.  At Southeast, Ray teaches classes in calculus, differential equations, computer programming and numerical analysis. These classes are taken by math, physics and computer science majors. The University believes future students will be enhanced by Ray’s learning experience with NSA.

Morrow will research legal matters involving American Indians in the counties of southeast and southwest Missouri.  This supports her recent research in the field of “Indian Law.” Her work will focus on whether American Indians were systematically discriminated against in legal matters at the county level in litigations.  She will try to find evidence to support, clarify or put to rest the prevalent story (among people of Indian heritage) that Missouri made it illegal for Indians to live in Missouri and used laws to defraud them of property. Morrow teaches classes on anthropology, archaeology and North American Indians and has a long history of involvement and research in Native American Indian affairs in our service region.