Science Complex Tops Southeast’s FY09 Capital Budget Request

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo.,

June 18, 2007 – Renovation and expansion of Southeast Missouri State University’s science complex is the highest priority in the University’s fiscal 2009 capital budget request to be submitted to the Missouri Department of Higher Education.

The request, which includes $12 million for a new science lab building and $27 million for renovation and construction in Johnson, Rhodes and Magill halls, was approved today by the Southeast Board of Regents.

“Because of the University’s continuing commitment to the development of applied sciences in Missouri and teaching through real world experiences, renovation and expansion of the science complex is now the University’s first priority for capital development,” said Dr. Dennis Holt, vice president for admissions and enrollment management.

Much of the University’s existing laboratory space was built and equipped in the early 1960s. Holt says the University Campus Master Plan has identified the need for additional specialized lab space due to changes in technology and advances in lab design. The need is compounded, he says, by the requirements of the University’s environmental science program.

The most effective way of meeting current science needs at Southeast is to construct a new building with state-of-the-art wet lab space and to renovate the dated Magill, Rhodes and Johnson halls to provide improved instructional space and to meet contemporary standards for infrastructure, Holt said.

The $12 million request for a new science lab building includes a $10 million request from the state along with a $2 million local match. Cost of the renovation of the existing science complex is estimated at $27 million.

The University’s second capital priority, Holt says, is a $26.9 million renovation of Academic Hall. This project would involve extensive interior renovation, upgrade of mechanical and electrical systems and upgrading all classrooms with information technology to accommodate the Department of English. Included in the work would be the replacement of 200 single glazed windows and repair of the slate roof. Exterior stone walls would be cleaned and waterproofed, and entrance doors would be replaced, he said.

Long-range requests are for improvements to Kent Library, Grauel Building, Memorial Hall, the Art Building, Brandt Hall, Scully Building and the campus tunnels.